Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

On this page you can find answers to some frequently asked questions on the topic of labour market integration. If you do not find the information you are looking for, you can contact the project management team here.

Definitions

According to the definition of the European Union, a beneficiary of international protection is: ‘A person who has been granted refugee status or subsidiary protection status’.

Refugee status explained: ‘ A refugee is someone who has been forced to flee his or her country because of persecution, war, or violence. A refugee has a well-founded fear of persecution for reasons of race, religion, nationality, political opinion or membership in a particular social group. Most likely, they cannot return home or are afraid to do so. War and ethnic, tribal and religious violence are leading causes of refugees fleeing their countries' (See also: UNHCR

subsidiary protection status explained:A person who received a subsidiary protection status, because according to international law he or she would face serious harm when returned to the country of origin. (See also: EUR-LEX

The benefits and rights of those with a beneficiary of international protection status, are determined by national law. It should at least cover income support, assistance in the case of illness and pregnancy and parental assistance. Also access to healthcare, including physical and mental healthcare. For more information and details about the rights and possibilities for beneficiaries of international protection, please visit your country page on this website.

 

Integration and Support

Your legal status upon arrival depends on the rules and regulations in your country of residence. In many countries you have to apply for a residence permit upon arrival. Please go to the page of your specific country of residence to find out more information.

The rules and regulations can differ per country, so please visit the country-page on this website to find out more about the necessity of obtaining a residence permit, ways to obtain one and the rights and obligations that are attached to a residence permit.

A residence permit gives access to a number of services and possibilities, but it depends per member state to what kind of services member states can get access with their residence permit status. You will at least have the right to stay for a certain period of time and have the right to work. Please visit your country of residence to find out more about possibilities to access employment, social welfare, healthcare and integration facilities.

Financial welfare support is often provided to beneficiaries of international protection, but the rules and regulations and the amount of financial support strongly differ per country. Please visit the country page on this website to find out more information about financial welfare support .

Integration programmes are often developed to address the specific needs of beneficiaries of international protection in their country of residence, such as language training and the provision of information about individual rights and obligations. Each member state should develop its own programmes, so it depends on the country you are living in whether or not there are integration programmes and the details of these programmes. Source

In many countries the government or civil society offer diverse programmes for integration. For support with integration, please go to a specific country page and click on the target group: ‘I am looking for a job’. On this page you will find more specific information about integration and support during the integration process in your country of residence.

Most countries offer voluntary or obligatory cultural orientation. If this is not the case in your country of residence, you can find information elsewhere such as online or via an educational institution. On the country page of your country of residence you will find more specific information about the culture.

Depending on your country of residence, there are information sessions organized or websites translated into different languages. Please visit the page on this website of your country of residence to see if this is the case.

 

Education & Trainings

  In many countries education is considered as a life-long pursuit and therefore there are institutions that can support adult learning. Go to the country pages to find out more specific information about adult learning opportunities.

Soft skills are personal and communicative skills, such as collegiality, networking skills, flexibility, and the ability to cooperate with others. Hard skills are technical skills, and can describe your ability to execute specific tasks or to do a specific job. Hard skills are more easily measurable and quantifiable. Soft skills are more difficult to measure, and are more generally applicable across various businesses or types of jobs. A car mechanic’s soft skills will describe his ability to cooperate with his colleagues, and his ability to communicate appropriately with his supervisor and his customers. His hard skills describe his technical knowledge of cars and his ability to accurately assess a car’s defects and repair them accordingly.

Trainings for developing new soft or hard skills (see also previous question) focused on the labour market are available in many countries. If you are interested in trainings, look for training opportunities on your country-page on this website to find out more.

In most EU countries it is possible to study, but often it is necessary to first learn the language. Also, it is often necessary to get your previous diplomas recognized. Look for information about diploma validation and translation, and specific requirements to study on the country page of your country of residence.

It depends on the rules and regulations in each country, so please visit the page of your current country of residence to learn more about the steps you can and should take to be able to study.  

 

The Labour Market

In many countries beneficiaries of international protection* are allowed to work either with or without obtaining a residence permit. The number of hours and the period someone can work differs per country. To learn more about the rules and regulations for each country, please go to the specific country page of this website.

Obtaining a work permit is a different process in every country and is also not always required, so please visit your country page on this website to learn more about obtaining a work permit.

To learn more about the working culture in your country of residence, it can be helpful to talk to a support service for integration or a social organization that provides support. Please visit your country page on this website to find out more about possibilities in your country for learning more about the working culture.

Information about the legal requirements, rights and duties for working differ strongly per country of residence. If you want to know more about these rules and regulations, please visit the country-page on this website for more information.

This depends on your age and the number of hours you work per week. Please go to the country page of your specific country of residence to find out more about the minimum wage in this specific country.

The structure of the labour market is country-specific, so to find out more about this structure please visit the country-page on this website for more information.

 

Preparing for the Labour Market

To find help or information with writing a CV and a cover letter, this website provides support and information: You can also look at a country-specific page on this website to see if more support is offered in your country or region.

If you want to get your foreign diplomas and certificates validated and translated, there should be possibilities in your country of residence. Please visit the country-page of your country of residence to learn more about these possibilities.

If you do not have (copies of) your diploma’s or certificates with you, some countries offer possibilities to have your skills and educational knowledge reviewed. Please go to your country-page to check if this possibility also exists in your country of residence.

you have never studied or took any courses, there are still be possibilities to work. Sometimes you can also learn and work at the same time. If you want to study, there are also possibilities. Please visit your country-page on this website to find out more.  

 

Looking for Work

On each page of the participating EU member states you can find information about how or where to find a job or find help with looking for a job. If you go to the homepage of this website, choose a country and then choose ‘looking for a job’ as a category which will guide you to a page with information and many external links that are useful for when you are looking for a job.


You can also look on the page: Opportunities, where you can see some vacancies available in your country of residence. Do you still have more questions after reading this information? Contact us here.

After arriving in your country of residence, you first go through a legal procedure to get a residence permit. It might be mandatory in your country of residence to go through an integration process also, after which you are eligible to start working. To find out specific information about the rules and regulations for beneficiaries of international protection* in your country of residence to start working, you should visit the country-page on this website.

All countries offer possibilities for child care during work hours, but it depends on the country whether you need to pay for child care or can receive compensation. Please look at the country-page on this website to find out more information.

Many countries offer specific options for people with a disability, but the exact details differ per country. Please look at the country-page on this website to find out more or contact someone from the integration office in your country of residence.

Many countries provide specific centres for job support or coaching or places to go, but the organizations or institution you should go to vary per country. To learn more about career options and support, please visit the country-specific page on this website to find an overview of the possibilities.

This depends on your previous work experience, skills and education, where you live exactly and, often, also on your motivation. It is important to learn the language of your country of residence, to increase labour market competitiveness and to keep an open mind about available opportunities in your community. Please go to the page of your country of residence to find out more specific information.

For the needs of the labour market and employers in your country of residence you can contact an employment agency, they often have an overview of the labour demands. If you visit your country-page on this website, you can find external links to employment agencies in your country of residence.

First of all, it is important to learn the language spoken in your country of residence, because this will often give you a lot more opportunities for finding a job, especially in your area of expertise. Look at a country page on this website, to find more specific information about finding work in your country of residence.   

If any networking events are planned, they are usually listed on the websites of municipalities, integration support services or other related organizations. Please visit your country-specific page on this website and find a website of any of these services for more information.

To meet other beneficiaries of international protection* find a cultural centre or a meeting centre in your neighborhood or ask integration services or support if they know about any of these meetings taking place. On the country-page on this website you will find links to these services.

 

Looking for an Employee

If you are an employer interested in hiring an international employee with a residence permit in your EU member state, go to the homepage and select your country and then click on the category: ‘I am looking for an employee’. On this page you will find more information about how to find an employee, as well as external links with more information.  

The rules, regulations, rights and obligations for hiring a beneficiary of international protection differ per country, in some countries it is necessary to have a working permit, while in other countries it is not. To learn more about this process, visit your country-page on this website for more specific information and external links.

In many countries, someone is eligible to work when he or she has a residence permit for that country. It depends, however, on the country of residence how many hours and for how long a person can work. To learn more about the rules and regulations for each country, please go to the specific country-page of this website and select the category: ‘I am looking for a job’ or ‘I am looking for an employee’.

According to growing evidence from many academia and practice, the benefits are the following:
- Diversity leads to a stronger workforce where individuals can share and learn from each other
- Migration enhances global competitiveness
- Migration allows companies to address labour shortages and specific skill needs
- Migrants represent an expanded customer base, often creating new market opportunities
- Better integrated migrants are successful due to higher motivation and productivity, and display higher loyalty towards their employer, resulting in less turnover and absenteeism
- A diverse workplace boosts competitiveness and innovation among employees
- Migration allows businesses to engage with local communities, often composed of migrants
- Migration allows businesses to engage with governments, for or against migration policies

In some countries services and subsidies are available for employers that hire beneficiaries of international protection. To learn more about these services or subsidies, visit the category: ‘I am looking to hire a beneficiary of international protection’ where information for your country should be portrayed.

The network and information sharing opportunities are country-specific, to learn more about these possibilities please visit the country-page on this website and go to the page that provides information on intermediaries.

In some countries information or trainings are available to help prepare an organization or business to diversify its workforce. Information will be available on this website under the specific country or region page with information for intermediaries. If there is no direct information available, advice can also be searched for at networking events or through employment agencies.

 

Offering Help to find a Job

If would like to support a beneficiary of international protection* with finding a job, please look at the specific category on your country page where more information is provided. You can also look at the ´I am looking for a job´ category to be able to find information specifically for beneficiaries of international protection* that you can also use to inform and assist BIP’s* that are looking for a job.

All information that is available to assist migrants and practical trainings or workshops should be on the target-group page for intermediaries of your country of residence. If you are looking for more information, you can also always try to contact a centre that provides integration support.  Information about integration support should be under the category ‘I am looking for a job’ on the country or region page.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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